Was Fort Bayard New Mexico Home For Our Troop G?

Examine the two photos of Buffalo Soldiers below [click image to increase size]:

Troop L - 10th Cavalry

Troop L (9th Cavalry *) captured in their baseball uniforms. I spotted this image today while viewing the New Mexico PBS segment “MOMENTS IN TIME: The Buffalo Soldiers in New Mexico“. I believe this could be the image “Yvonne”, a TEMPO reader emailed us about, having seen it as part of a New Mexico History Museum exhibit last December.

I believe this image was taken while the men were in ACTIVE service. Attached NMHM metadata indicates it was taken in 1899 at Fort Wingate.

Military-Mystery---Taos-News-I

Troop G (9th Cavalry) our original mystery Buffalo Soldiers held post at Fort Bayard from 1875-1899, according to this “Units Posted at Fort Bayard” record. General consensus is we’re looking at a REUNION photo taken sometime after their service.

We believe the dog present in both pictures is the same. He looks older in the Troop G photo but that would make sense if the image was taken AFTER their active duty. Also note the framework of the doors, columns and steps. Though the painting differs, the build structure looks similar to the Troop L image.

Lastly, email comments from “Cecilia” of the Fort Bayard Historic Preservation Society

“Although I can not be for certain, I have seen other Ft Bayard buildings and photos that suggest this might be Fort Bayard. Fort Selden and Fort Cummings were nearly all constructed of adobe. Yes, Fort Bayard had many regiments of the 9th Cavalry.”

Though we can’t confirm 100% Fort Bayard was home for our Troop G, it does appear we’re on the right track to doing so; along with a new possibility the regiment held post at Fort Wingate.

According to Buffalo Soldiers (Zianet):

“In 1875-76, the 9th Cavalry Regiment was transferred to the New Mexico District, under command of Colonel Edward Hatch. Two companies were stationed at Fort Bayard, one at Fort McRae, two at Fort Wingate, three at Fort Stanton, one at Fort Union, one at Fort Selden, and one at Fort Garland.”

So Stay tuned! Clearly these Soldiers have returned home with MUCH to say!:)

Luckie

RESOURCES:

02.23.15 FOOTNOTE: Troop L details provided by Hannah Abelbeck, Photo Archivist NM History Museum

  • We have the group and location noted as 9th Cavalry at Fort Wingate. I’d have to look into the source and see if I can figure out when and why that metadata got assigned. Sometimes information comes to us on the photo; sometimes it is assigned later. Maybe our info is incorrect and Fort Bayard is another option; maybe it is perfectly correct already. Or maybe the two different units are somehow interrelated (changed names, consolidated, split, etc). Here’s our online record: http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/acpa/id/5049/rec/1
  • The photo came to us from a dealer circa 1981. In the same accession were two other photos, identified as: 9th Cavalry, Troop H also from Fort Wingate circa 1899-1900, and the NCOs of 9th Cavalry, Troop L, at Fort Wingate, circa 1899.
  • The notes on all three images are from the same hand—seems likely that they are from the dealer. There is a chance that they came from the same estate, but we have no information on their provenance. The baseball photo seems to have two names written on it, perhaps, but the writing is not good: it might say “Capt. Day” and “Lt. Pritchard” or something that kind of looks like those names.
    Both of the Troop L images are made by the Imperial Photo Gallery and are on the same type and size of mount. Looking closer, the buildings captured in both of those images look to be from the same architectural style—adobe brick. They also both have horizontal multi-paned glass windows over the doors. They are not, however, exactly the same side of the same building—the arrangement of doors and windows, the supports, and the size of the porch are different.  These are both different than the image you have, which has clearly discernible siding.
    The units in our photos mostly seem to have been identified by their troop flags (or baseball jerseys).
    There were many buildings at both forts, and many structures at Wingate were damaged in fire in the 1890s. So while we have photos of both Forts, they aren’t systematic enough (individual buildings are photographed erratically, groups of buildings are shot from too far away to differentiate between subtle architectural details), so I’m unable to venture confirming or excluding either site for your photo.
    Interestingly, the hat style for both K and H at this time (1899) seems to have been the western-style Cavalry hat. Also on the topic of hats, I’ve attached a detail from the 9th Cavalry band photo (Santa Fe Plaza circa 1880) where you can see men in the band wearing the regular cap, but with two different insignias. The hat style changes again after 1910, and the troops up north (like, Troop K, Wyoming) in the 1890s seem wear yet another style of hat.
    I didn’t see any men in any of our photos that seemed obvious matches for the men in your photos, but I was not doing detailed comparisons. And, as far as we know, these were different units and they may not even have served concurrently.
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Are Our Soldiers Wearing GAR Medals? #BuffaloSoldier

The mystery continues! Compare the medal worn by one of our Mystery Soldiers and the featured Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) medal. Are they one in the same? And if yes, what does this tell us about their military service?

9th G Troop - Taos News

GAR Medal - Taos News

Now consider the medal (below) worn by this distinguished Buffalo Solider from Company A, 25th United States Infantry Regiment. Are we looking at the same medal and if so, what does that tell us?

Officer of Company A, 25th United States Infantry Regiment

Questions of the day:

  • Did our Soldiers serve in the Civil or Indian War? Could they have served in both?
  • Are the medals worn in fact GAR medals awarded for Marksmanship?
  • Would soldiers in the Civil and Indian Wars have received the same type of medal?
  • When and where was the picture taken? Could it have been Fort Bayard New Mexico? Checkout the Fort Bayard “porch” featured in this 1886 image. Is this the backdrop of our group photo? Buffalo Soldiers were stationed there and the 9th Cavalry unit was posted there from 1875-1899.

MANY thanks to my geneaholics (True and Bernita) and history/military buffs tossing their research eye into our search for answers. Kudos to Rick Romancito,  TEMPO readers via Taos News and our new friends at the New Mexico Museum of History! Your contributions are keeping us very BUSY!:)

So stay tuned… looks like there will be lots more to come!:)

RESOURCES:

Units Posts - Fort Bayard

G Troop Continues To Speak…

Military-Mystery---Taos-News-II

Gloria Longval is a gifted Cuban artist and owner of the 9th Regiment, Company G image. She tells me it was purchased in 1965, at an estate sale in Los Angeles.

Gloria paid .40 cents each for 4 picture frames, and it wasn’t until 3 days later she discovered the 9th Cavalry image hidden securely between two mats, and on the underside the horse and carriage image featured above.

She tells me she’s never shared the images with anyone outside of her immediate family, only taking them to be appraised in 1994 and last week to Taos News, in the hope it would prompt a Black History Month feature.

Having lost her Husband in 1965, Gloria shared how the image of the soldiers helped to ease her grief. She’d often examine their faces, wondering about the lives of the 10 men.

So what have we learned and/or confirmed?

  • The soldiers are in fact the 9th Regiment, Company G; also referred to as “G Troop”. The emblem on their hats confirm this — “9” at the top of the crossed sabers and “G” below, medals and uniform style.
  • They are Buffalo Soldiers who we believe served in Texas, Kansas and New Mexico. It’s possible they were recruited in New Orleans in 1866.
  • The medals they’re wearing are not Medals of Honor. We’re working to confirm what the medals represent, at least one medal appears to be for “marksmanship”.
  • The image is believed to be a “reunion” shot, taken sometime after their service. The location to be determined.
  • I’ve reached out to friends at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture for historical input and validation.
  • True Lewis has enlisted the aid of researchers from the US Army War College to provide additional insight into G Troop’s history and service record.
  • We’re hopeful we’ll be able to identify these men by name and who knows, possibly connect them to living descendants.

The above image was preserved and sold along with the 9th Regiment picture. Is it possible they are connected? Can anyone identify the building in the background?

When it’s all said and done, I’ll work with Gloria to find a permanent home for our Soldiers.

I believe they are speaking and will continue to guide us. They are true soldiers. They are fighting for freedom.

Luckie

Military Mystery: Unknown WWI United States Negro Troop. Could They Be Our 812th Pioneer Infantry?

USCT-MYSTERY-(combined)click on image to enlarge

As I continue on my mission to find more details about the Company K, 812th Pioneer Infantry for AAGSAR Members Mary (Jewells In Dem Kentucky Hills) and Bernita (Voices Inside My Head), I *stumbled upon* these striking images of an unidentified United States troop of African American Soldiers from World War I.

These Unknown Negro Troop images were located with equally amazing images of the Company B, 814th Pioneer Infantry, with these additional details:

Company B, 814th Pioneer Infantry
Captain William D. Haydon, Comdr., “Black Devils”
January 31, 1919
Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky.

Royal Photo Co. #863
Lou, Ky.

The original researcher appears to be Irita CANADY, and included this additional information:

I met with a couple of cousins, Wanda Bailey and Denny Norman, August 16, 2006 in Zanesville, Ohio, Although our meeting was regarding the Gant House, Wanda brought along 2 old military photos which I took digital pics of. She doesn’t know the owner of the photos as they had been sitting outside in the elements for several days after a house fire. She has given me permission to pass the images along (1) to be posted on the Lest We Forget & African American Genealogy Group of the Miami Valley web sites and (2) hopefully some of the soldiers can be identified. – Irita Canady

So what do you think? Is the fact these Unknown WWI images were in found in close proximity to the 814th Pioneer Infantry images significant? They do represent 2 separate troops and had identical frames. Who was the original owner and what was his/her connection to the images?

Is this Mary’s and Bernita’s Company K, 812th Pioneer Infantry?

Luckie

FOOTNOTE:

Rare Historical Find! Liljenquist Civil War Photographs Collection ~ Library of Congress

Liljenquist Collection - Unidentified African American soldier in Union Zouave uniformIf you haven’t seen the AMAZING collection of Civil War images donated to the Library of Congress in 2010 by the Liljenquist Family, you are missing a historical treat!

The Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs contains 1220+ ambrotypes and tintypes portrait photographs capturing both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War (1861-1865), including many portraits of African American Soldiers!

The Liljenquist Collection Summary:

More than 1,000 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, represent both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War (1861-1865). The photographs often show weapons, hats, canteens, musical instruments, painted backdrops, and other details that enhance the research value of the collection. Among the most rare images are sailors, African Americans in uniform, Lincoln campaign buttons, and portraits of soldiers with their families and friends.

Tom Liljenquist and his sons Jason, Brandon, and Christian built this collection in memory of President Abraham Lincoln and the 620,000 Union and Confederate servicemen who died in the American Civil War. For many, these photographs are the last known record we have of who they were and what they looked like. See “From the Donor’s Perspective–The Last Full Measure” for the full story.

The Liljenquist Family began donating their collection to the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division in 2010 and continues to add to it. In addition to the ambrotypes and tintypes, the collection also includes several manuscripts, patriotic envelopes, photographs on paper, and artifacts related to the Civil War.

Take your time and go through the collection. You never know when you might find a long, lost Ancestor.

Luckie

References:

U.S. COLORED TROOPS: WINGFIELD Union Soldiers of the Civil War

Company B 103 Regiment - Unidentified Civil War UNION Soldier

Earlier tonight Bernita ALLEN (Air Force SME) of AAGSAR (African American Genealogy and Slave Ancestry Research) shared an awesome site to research your Civil War Ancestors, the National Park Service: Soldiers and Sailors Database. I’ve already identified 8 WINGFIELD Civil War Soldiers I need to research further to determine if a family connection exists!

Albeit connected by SURNAME, blood and/or plight, I honor these WINGFIELD men of service. I’ll keep you posted on connections too! AMAZING!:)

Luckie

*****************

Wingfield, Albert

  • Regiment Name: 13th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union

Wingfield, Alexander

  • Regiment Name: 115th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union

Wingfield, Charles

  • Regiment Name: 95th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union

Wingfield, Charles

  • Regiment Name: 97th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union

Wingfield, John

  • Regiment Name: 95th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union
  • Alternate Name: John/Winfield

Wingfield, John

  • Regiment Name: 97th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union
  • Alternate Name: John/Winfield

Wingfield, John

  • Regiment Name: 103rd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union
  • Alternate Name: John/Wingfield

Wingfield, William

  • Regiment Name: 1st Regiment, United States Colored Infantry
  • Side: Union

USCT Recruitment Poster

NOTE: NPS Soldiers and Sailors database results returned 222 WINGFIELD Confederate Soliders. I also plan to research [and honor] my Confederate Ancestors of military service

REFERENCES:

U.S. ARMY Pvt. Elbert CODY III (b. 1894) ~ WWI Veteran of Warrenton, Georgia

Camp Gordon 1918-1919  - IPvt. Elbert CODY III (b. 1894) descends from a long line of Elberts in our family. He was Grandson [and namesake] to my 4th Great Grandfather, Elbert CODY (b. 1820), the son of Elbert II (b. 1847) and Lula CODY of Warrenton, Georgia. If you need help keeping up with our Elberts, just check here – A Tale of Many Elberts ~ CODY, DORSEY, DAWSON, WINGFIELD & STRINGER.

Elbert CODY III is my 1st Cousin, 4xs removed.

As I’ve shared, I was delighted to find Elbert and Zack JONES, Cousin Gwen’s Grandfather, being inducted together and sent to Atlanta’s Camp GORDON for war-training. I’d give anything to know what they talked about on that day or how they felt being sworn in. Or to hear their experiences as part of the newly formed Colored Troops!

Cousin Elbert served overseas from July 1918 to July 1919 with Company C 327th Service Battalion and was Honorably Discharged July 15, 1919.

He departed this life on December 3, 1950 and is buried at the Highland Park Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio; a Military Headstone marking his grave.

Camp Gordon 1918-1919 - IINegro Recruits Camp Gordon 1918

I’m still seeking to learn where he served and to find his name on an official Roster List. Finding historical documentation of our African American in service has proven to be quite the challenge, and was the genesis for my creating this blog.

Our men deserve better. They are deserving of honor and recognition for their service. We can’t allow their stories, service and memories to be blotted out of history.

As you can see, I’ve discovered more than a few images of Camp Gordon Negro recruits 1917-1918 online via the National Archives.

Who can say? I could very well be looking in the face of Cousins Elbert and Zack as they made their way to Camp Gordon!

I’m hopeful some of my CODY-DORSEY-JONES cousins will find a familiar face among these young men. Now wouldn’t that be something!:)

Elbert CODY III - WWI Service CardElbert CODY III – Georgia, World War I Service Cards, 1917-1919

Elbert CODY III - Army Registration CardElbert CODY III – Army Registration Card 1917

Camp Gordon 1918-1919 - IIIAfrican American Soldiers at Camp Gordon listening to another Soldier read 1917-1918

Camp Gordon GA 1918 - IVCamp Gordon New Recruits receiving instruction – 1918 Georgia